Authority record. Showing 209 results

NATO International Information Conference

  • AC/1
  • Corporate body
  • 1951

The AC/1 chronological series contains the records of the NATO International Information Conference. This conference was held on 12-14 April 1951 in London, under the auspices of the NATO Information Service and the Heads of Information Services of the twelve signatories to the North Atlantic Treaty.Its purpose was to elicit discussion of the programme proposed by the NATO Information Service, to define the role of NATO's civil and military bodies in the area of information and to allow officials from the various national Information Services to outline the situation prevailing in their countries. During the Conference, problems of organization and liaison between the national information services and the NATO Information Service were addressed. Finally, the conference provided an opportunity to deal with issues related to the use of information technologies and resources for raising awareness of NATO, as well as to the strategy employed in the ideological struggle.The delegates examined several resolutions, which led to the submission of recommendations to the Council Deputies(1).

Atlantic Community Committee

  • AC/10
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1952

The AC/10 chronological series contains the records of the Committee on the North Atlantic Community.Established in October 1951, this Committee was responsible for making recommendations on foreign policy co-ordination and discussions, closer economic, financial and social ties and, finally, co-operation on culture and information. To assist it in its duties, it set up a working group tasked with the preparatory work for the Committee’s endeavours, whose duties are detailed in the first document of the series (see AC/10-D/1). The Committee and the Working Group both met in Belgrave Square, London and, in the documents, are often referred to indiscriminately.A report (see C/8-D/6) was submitted to the Council by the Committee in February 1952. The Council agreed the Committee’s recommendations, including the resolution to eliminate the Committee and to transfer its role and responsibilities to the North Atlantic Council.

Defence Planning - Multilateral Discussions

  • AC/100
  • Corporate body
  • 1956

The AC/100 chronological series contains the records on the Defence Planning Multilateral Discussions.
These discussions took place in a context of growing tension and threat to the NATO countries. These threats were due, firstly, to the modernization of armaments and the spread of nuclear weapons and, secondly, to new political factors such as the creation of the Warsaw Pact and the change in the USSR’s stance on the reunification of Germany.
In November 1955, the International Staff expressed the desire to set out a procedure for adjusting defence planning (see C-M(55)113). This was accomplished through the draft Council resolution of 6 December 1955 (see C-M(55)120), which suggested defence planning discussions as
a way of making as much information about the defence problems as possible available to all the countries and fostering collective exchanges of views on those problems. It also made provision for discussions that brought together the civil and military representatives of the Member governments, the NATO military authorities and the International Staff. This resolution was adopted by the Council at its meeting on 15 December 1955 (see C-R(55)59).
At the first Council meeting of 1956 (C-R(56)1), the Secretary General of the Organization, Lord Ismay, said that the aim of the discussions would be to enable each NATO country to have authoritative advice on the new defence planning structure.
The meetings, held on 20-26 February 1956, were chaired by Lord Ismay. Their mission was to provide information rather than produce decisions, and took the form of briefings(1) by the military authorities followed by discussions(2). There were no further discussions of this kind after that point.
Working groups were formed, two of which produced documents. The first had been set up to review the divisional organization of the land forces (see AC/100(WG-1)R/1 and AC/100(WG-1)VR/1). The second was tasked with reviewing the forward scatter system (see AC/100(WG-2)D/1 and AC/100(WG-2)WP/1 and 2).

Working Group to Examine International Coordination of Supply in Wartime

  • AC/101
  • Corporate body
  • 1956-1958

From 1950 (see C/4-D-4/9 and C-M(55)71), the Council (with the support of the Delegations) affirmed the need for Commodity Boards responsible for: -establishing priority civil and military requirements in wartime -comparing requirements and available resources -proposing the agreements needed. France proposed that this body be created in peacetime so that priorities could be coordinated in advance. There was no unanimity on this proposal. On 31 January 1956, subject to confirmation by those countries which were hesitating, the Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee (AC/98) approved the creation of AC/101 (see AC/98-R/1). F.D. Gregh (ASG for Economic and Financial Affairs) was appointed Chairman of AC/101. One representative per member nation, the representative of the Standing Group Liaison Office in Paris and a SHAPE representative also attended the meetings. AC/101 was tasked with finalizing the draft terms of reference for a Central Supplies Agency (CSA) presented by France (AC/101-D/1), i.e.: -decide whether the body should exist in peacetime or wartime-establish the composition and terms of reference of this body. AC/101 delegated this task to a sub-group consisting of representatives of the United States, France, the Netherlands, Italy and the United Kingdom.

Working Group on Article 2 Survey

  • AC/108
  • Corporate body
  • 1956

The AC/108 chronological series contains the documents of the Working Group on Article 2 Survey. This working group was established by a Council decision (see C-R(56)24) to verify and review the survey of Article 2 of the North Atlantic Treaty (see C-M(56)45). It met regularly between May and October 1956, after which time the Working Group continued to consider possible amendments to the new version of Article 2 that was presented in August 1956, with a view to publishing them before the end of 1956. Once its task was completed in December 1956, the Working Group’s work came to an end.

Working Group on Sharing Costs of SACLANT Headquarters

  • AC/11
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1952

The AC/11 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on Sharing Costs of SACLANT (Supreme Allied Command Atlantic) Headquarters. The Working Group was created by the Council Deputies on 22 August 1951 and given the task of finding a formula for sharing the costs of the SACLANT budget (D-R(51)63). The meetings were chaired by G. O. J. van Tets and attended by a representative of each national delegation. The Working Group held its first meeting on 18 October 1951 and met six additional times over the proceeding seven months. During the meetings the Working Group discussed how the costs of the SACLANT Headquarters should be divided amongst them. This proved to be a very contentious issue and there was considerable debate on the subject. Numerous proposals were made over the course of the meetings; some favoured grouping the nations by size, while others preferred to derive the contribution from GNP. The Working Group finally agreed, albeit with reservations, to a method of dividing the costs on their last meeting on 4 April 1952.

Committee of Technical Advisors

  • AC/110
  • Corporate body
  • 1956-1957

The AC/110 chronological series contains the records of the Committee of Technical Advisors.This committee was created by the Council in July 1956, with the primary purpose being to come to the aid of the underdeveloped countries (proposal by the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Christian Pineau). Consisting of representatives from each member country, the committee worked under the authority of the Council. It was tasked with summarizing the position taken by each member nation on the links between the problems of economic development in the underdeveloped countries on the one hand, and the stability and well-being of the NATO member nations on the other, as well as the various economic and technical aspects of the Pineau plan. The Committee met for the first time on 23 July 1956. It submitted its report to the Council on 18 December 1956 (C-M(56)142), which discussed it at its meeting on 16 January,1957 (C-R(57)3).In January 1957, the Committee was disbanded following the creation of the Economic Committee(1), to which its functions and responsibilities were transferred (C-M(56)127).

Ad Hoc Working Group on Pipelines

  • AC/111
  • Corporate body
  • 1956

The AC/111 chronological series contains the records of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Pipelines.At its meeting on 18 July 1956 (C-R(56)40), the Council examined a note submitted by the French delegation (C-M(56)95). It subsequently decided to set up an ad hoc working group responsible for submitting recommendations to it on the French proposals seeking a revision of documents C-M(55)74 and C-M(56)83 in connection with the Central Europe area.France felt that it was necessary to decentralize the NATO POL pipeline system as much as possible in order to ensure that it operated smoothly. With this in mind, it suggested that a national pipeline operating agency be set up in each country of Central Europe, and that the role of the NATO Central Europe Operating Agency be modified.The Working Group made up of representatives of the user nations of the Central Europe Pipeline System met for the first time on 27 July 1956 under the chairmanship of Mr A. F. Moreau, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Production and Logistics, assisted by representatives from the user nations, members of the International Staff and representatives from the Permanent Group and SHAPE.The Working Group examined the French proposals and produced a report which contained a specific project for the organization of the NATO Pipeline System in the central European region, which provided for the creation of a national agency in one or more countries, and which took account of the pressing need to put in place functional units known as "Divisions". This document, which is dated 11 December 1956, was submitted to the Council under reference C-M(56)129.The Council approved the text at its meeting on 19 December 1956 (C-R(56)77), and decided to recommend that interested countries immediately establish the proposed Organization, to wit the Central Europe Operating Agency and the Central Europe Pipeline Office.On 26 November 1956, after completing its work, the Working Group decided to disband.

NATO Pipeline Committee

  • AC/112
  • Corporate body
  • 1956-1965

The AC/112 chronological series contains the records of the NATO Pipeline Committee. On 12 May 1954, the Council approved the establishment of a working group (C-R(54)21) tasked to study the proposals of the Permanent Group (SGM 234-54) for the supervision, operation and maintenance of the NATO POL Pipeline System. Pursuant to these instructions, this Working Group produced an initial report outlining the organization of the supervision, operation and maintenance of the POL system as a whole(1) (C-M(55)74). At its meeting on 18 July 1956, the Council decided (C-R(56)40) to set up the NATO Pipeline Committee, which was tasked, as provided for in documents C-M(55)74 and C-M(56)129, to act on its behalf, in close cooperation with NATO military authorities and other competent bodies (CEPO, CEOA, etc.), on all matters pertaining to the supervision, operation and maintenance of the infrastructure of pipelines of likely interest to NATO as a whole. The NATO Pipeline Committee, made up of representatives from each member nation, was to meet only as required. Its Chairman was appointed by the Secretary General.The Committee met for the first time on 16 August 1956 under the chairmanship of Mr. A. Moreau, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Production and Logistics. Its first task was to identify the main problems the Committee would need to resolve. It therefore focused initially on funding for the operation and maintenance of the System and on the status of personnel. At its third meeting on 5 November 1956, the Committee decided to set up a Working Group on damage, which would be responsible for looking into the problem of damage caused by the operation of the NATO Pipeline System and to submit proposals concerning financial arrangements and methods of settlement. By late 1965, the NATO Pipeline Committee had held 33 meetings. It still operates today under the name "NATO Petroleum Committee" (2).

Political Committee

  • AC/119
  • Corporate body
  • 1957

The AC/119 chronological series contains the records of the Political Committee. Established by the North Atlantic Council in January 1957 (C-M(57)3), pursuant to the recommendation of the Committee of Three(1), this committee is made up of a representative of each delegation, accompanied by experts from his or her country as required. It is chaired by the Assistant Secretary General for Political Affairs. The Political Committee is responsible for carrying out all of the studies and preparatory work to assist the Council and the Secretary General in fulfilling their political consultation responsibilities. It inherited tasks that had been previously assigned to the Working Group on Trends of Soviet Policy(2). The Political Committee(3) met for the first time on 29 January 1957. In order to fulfil its wide-ranging mission, it was decided to set up subgroups of regional experts in order to address specific issues and provide a broad outline of the situation in each part of the world. Beginning in 1957, groups of regional experts reporting to the Political Committee began to operate. These were: - the Working Group on Trends of Soviet Policy, which took over from the former AC/34 working group; - the Group of Experts on the Satellite Countries, whose first report was issued in March 1957; - the Group of Middle East Experts, which met for the first time in March 1957; - the Group of Far East Experts, whose first meeting was held in November 1958; - the Working Group on Latin America, set up in 1961; - the Working Group on Africa, the only group whose documents had their own reference number (AC/146), which was abandoned in 1961. In 1967 the Council broadened the terms of reference of the Political Committee, after which point disarmament experts would meet under its auspices at regular intervals.The Political Committee is a standing committee which still sits today.

Petroleum Planning Committee

  • AC/12
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-2003

The AC/12 chronological series contains the records of the Petroleum Planning Committee (PPC). The PPC is one of the eight Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) planning boards and committees responsible for peacetime coordination and follow-up of the NATO countries' arrangements for maintaining civil preparedness in emergencies and times of crisis. Its creation is approved by the Council Deputies on 28 January 1952 (see D-R(52)8). Its initial terms of reference established on 28 January 1952 (see (D-D(52)6-FINAL) were amended on 28/11/1952 (C-M(52)112), then revised on 15/12/1966 (AC/12-D/357). In line with its terms of reference, the PPC established the bodies it deemed appropriate to assist it. For information, three sub-groups were active in 1988: the PPC Working Group (PPCWG), the Oil Data and Communication Group (ODCG), and the Training and Exercise Group (TEG) (see AC/12-D/795). The PPC's mission was to appraise the countries' petroleum requirements in the event of war and do the necessary planning for meeting any problems that might arise (see D-D(52)6-FINAL). Starting in 1973, the planning also covered gas requirements (see AC/12-DS/69). For that purpose, it was responsible for the proper functioning of the NATO Wartime Oil Organization (NWOO). In these fields, the PPC's functions conformed to the basic aims of CEP, i.e. to ensure the survival of populations in the event of an attack, the support of military operations, the protection and utilization of vital resources, and the early recovery and rehabilitation of the countries (see AC/12-D/357). The PPC normally met twice a year (see AC/12-D/795). The chairmanship, preferably rotational, was held by a national representative for a period of three years; starting in 1962 the chairman could be re-elected for a further one year (see AC/12-R/42 and AC/98-D/161). Representatives of the NATO military committees had to attend the meetings of the Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee (SCEPC).Originally the PPC reported to the Council Deputies through the Financial and Economic Board (FEB) (see D-D(52)6-FINAL). Each government was represented in the PPC by a representative and an alternate. It could also designate advisers to its representative (see D-D(52)6-FINAL).After the FEB was abolished in 1952 (see D-R(52)27-FINAL), the PPC was linked to the Committee on Wartime Commodity Problems (AC/25) until the latter was dissolved for the creation of the SCEPC (see AC/98-D/1 and C-M(55)100).Thus the PPC became one of the CEP planning boards and committees. Given the review of the the CEP planning and review cycle every four years, the PPC approved its program and its work objectives for the forthcoming cycle at the start of each cycle. These proposals were submitted to the SCEPC, then to the Council, and finally to the ministers for approval (see C-M(77)16). During the cycle, the PPC made an annual report to the SCEPC plenary and, through it, to the Council (see AC/12-D/79). In its annual report, the PPC presented to what extent progress had been made, indicating wherever possible how the Allied countries had benefited from its work (see AC/12-D/357).It had a close working relationship, either directly or through its subordinate services, with the other NATO bodies involved in the development of plans for the wartime oil situation: in particular with the Standing Group, the Planning Board for Ocean Shipping and the Defence Production Board (see D-D(52)6-FINAL). The PPC was declared dormant by the SCEPC on 21/01/1999, then disbanded on 7 January 2003 (see AC/98-N(2003)1)

Petroleum Planning Committee team of pipeline and storage experts

  • AC/12(PS)
  • Corporate body
  • 1953

The AC/12(PS) chronological series contains the records of the Petroleum Planning Committee (PPC) team of pipeline and storage experts (hereinafter referred to as "the Team").The Team was established by the PPC following a request from the Infrastructure Committee (see AC/12-D/45). Its mandate was to assess whether the Fifth Slice POL Infrastructure Programme, recommended by SHAPE in AG_6100/5/E-709/53_LOG, would overcome the shortfall in capabilities for the distribution of POL in the event of war. If not, it would propose the construction of safe and economical pipelines and storage tanks in sufficient numbers (see AC/12(PS)-R/1). It should report on these questions by 20 September 1953 at the latest. As it did not have time to produce a detailed report, the Infrastructure Committee agreed to accept a preliminary report (see AC/12-D/44). The Team presented its report to the PPC via its Chairman at the meeting held on 7 September 1953 (see AC/12(PS)-R/1). The Team held its last meeting on 7 September 1953 (see AC/12(PS)-R/1).

Central Europe Pipeline Policy Committee

  • AC/120
  • Corporate body
  • 1956-1974

The AC/120 chronological series contains the records of the Central Europe Pipeline Policy Committee.The CEPPC began its work in December 1956. It was made up of representatives from the eight NATO nations which were using the Central Europe System, i.e. Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. Representatives from SHAPE also attended the meetings. At the start of its first meeting on 17 December 1956, the Committee elected an interim president, Mr. A.L.M. Cary (UK Representative).As provided for in C-M(56)129 (as approved by the Council on 19 December 1956 (C-R(56)77)), the Committee was tasked with acting in close cooperation with the Central Europe Pipeline Office on all matters related to the operation and maintenance of the Central Europe Pipeline System and, in particular, it was required to define and allocate financial and economic liability. Its prior approval was necessary for all decisions by the Central Europe Pipeline Office, the Central Europe Operating Agency, and the national agencies and divisions with respect to the allocation of common funding. In addition, the Committee was tasked with formulating and recommending solutions to all conflicts of a financial or economic nature dealing with the operation and maintenance of the Central Europe system. It appointed its own Chairman, and met only as required.The NATO Pipeline Committee operated under the same name until late 1997(1). It was subsequently replaced by the new "CEPMO Board of Directors" (2).

Working Group to consider further action by NATO in the field of scientific and technical cooperation.

  • AC/123
  • Corporate body
  • 1957

In the middle of the 1950s, it appeared important to NATO to concern itself not only with political or military issues, but also with civil issues. The aim was to look into the scientific and technical fields which might give NATO the opportunity to employ highly-qualified staff and establish predominance of the West over the Soviet Union in the fields of defence, economy and culture. The report of the Committee of Three (C-M(56)127-REV1), a proposal by the US (RDC(57)53) and the NATO Manpower Planning Committee were all drafted or established along those lines. The Council accepted their views. It approved the setting up of AC/123 (see C-R(57)9) and its terms of reference (AC/123-D/1). AC/123 was chaired by Mr Cullingford (the Chair of the Manpower Planning Committee). The meetings were attended by the Chairs of: -the Defence Production Committee, -the Scientific Working Group on Civil Production, -the Working Group on Trends in Soviet Foreign Policy,-the Annual Review Committee-(but also) by the scientific advisor to SHAPE and consultants from France and the US. The terms of reference of AC/123 stipulated that the working group would:-meet after the meeting of the experts of the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (OEEC) on 11 and 12 March 1957, -base itself on the OEEC report, the activities of the European Productivity Agency and the presentation by the US expert (AC/123-WP/1) in the preparation of its own studies, -decide whether it was preferable for NATO to simply apply the measures advocated by the OEEC, to add to them or to propose its own, -present a report on the topic to the Manpower Planning Committee. The latter would then submit the report to the Council. AC/123 met twice after the OEEC experts meeting. The report was published on 1 April 1957 (see C-M(57)50). On 24 April 1957, the Council approved the recommendations contained in the report (see C-R(57)25), in particular regarding the establishment of a small working group tasked with preparing a conference bringing together experts to discuss scientific and technical cooperation. AC/123 was thus replaced by AC/132.

Conference of National Information Officers

  • AC/124
  • Corporate body
  • 1957-1974

The AC/124 chronological series contains the records of the Conference of National Information Officers. The first Conference of National Information Officers was held in 1951, the second in 1953 and the third in 1955(1) .The AC/124 series contains the records of the Conferences of National Information Officers from 1957 onward. The aim of these conferences was to review the Member countries’ information distribution efforts. We have no terms of reference per se for these conferences, which followed up on three others. The records from the first conference include the recommendations of the North Atlantic Council Deputies, which had proposed a meeting of senior information officers in order to establish close co-operation between the Member countries’ information services in the framework of ideological warfare (see D-D(51)62, D-R(51)13 and D-R(51)14).

Economic Committee

  • AC/127
  • Corporate body
  • 1957

The AC/127 chronological series contains the records of the Economic Committee. This committee was set up in January 1957 by the Council, pursuant to the recommendation of the Committee of Three(1), with a view to promoting cooperation between NATO member nations. Its terms of reference, defined on 23 January 1957, were finally adopted on 14 February, 1957. They appear in Annex A to C-R(57)4, and stipulate that the Committee of Economic Advisers(2), set up under the authority of the Council, "will consist of representatives from all member nations. They could normally be the officials mainly concerned with the work of other international economic organizations". This Committee was tasked to "study and report to the Council on economic issues of special interest to the Alliance, particularly those which have political or defence implications or affect the economic health of the Atlantic Community as a whole. Such studies or preparatory work may be assigned to it by the Council or authorised by the Council at the request of the Secretary General or of the Committee itself." The Committee of Economic Advisers was assigned the tasks which were previously those of the Committee of Technical Advisers after the disbandment of that group(3) . The Committee of Economic Advisers met for the first time on 28 March 1957, chaired by the Assistant Secretary General for Economics and Finance. Its first task was to more closely define the scope of its work and develop a Programme of Work. In April 1958, the Council agreed that the Committee on Soviet Economic Policy would act as a Sub-Committee(4) under the general direction of the Committee of Economic Advisers (C-M(58)61 and C-R(58)28). In February 1970, the Committee re-examined its activities with a view to simplifying its procedures and concentrating its efforts on activities corresponding most closely to the needs of the Council and delegations and came to the conclusion that "there is no need to modify the terms of this mandate which appear sufficiently flexible"(C-M(70)2. Within the scope of the mandate, a distinction was identified between two main tasks: - to supply, as required, the Council with economic assessments and advice either on current policy issues or on more general problems; - to establish a pool of economic data with a view to providing a common interpretation of the situation for the use of national delegations. At its meeting on 25 February 1970 (C-R(70)8), the Council agreed that "the report C-M(70)2 should serve as a guide for the Committee's future activities" and that in English the Committee would be called "Economic Committee" (C-R(70)8). The Economic Committee is a standing committee which still sits today.

Economic Committee - East West Trade

  • AC/127(EWT)
  • Corporate body
  • 1961-1977

The AC/127(EWT) chronological series contains the Economic Committee’s records on trade agreements. The first record is a note from France on 28 July 1961. The last record in this series was submitted by the Turkish Delegation on 19 April 1977(1).

Economic Committee - Working Group on the Ex Post Facto Notification of Officially-backed Export Credits of over Five Years to Communist Countries

  • AC/127(NEC)
  • Corporate body
  • 1964-1986

The AC/127(NEC) chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on the Ex Post Facto Notification of Officially-backed Export Credits of over Five Years to Communist Countries.
This working group was set up in February 1964 to develop rules on how to handle the exchange of information on the backing of credits of over five years to communist countries. Made up of representatives from the member nations, it produced a report dated 21 October 1964 in which it recommended that all officially-backed credits for a duration greater than five years beginning 31 December 1962 should be the subject of an exchange of information. The Economic Committee approved the report, and decided that these information exchanges would take place. In January 1965, the Economic Committee announced that ex post facto notifications by the member nations of credits of over five years would be notified under a new Economic Committee series bearing the reference AC/127 (NEC).
The last document in this series was submitted by Germany on 15 April 1986.

Economic Committee - Ad Hoc Study Group on Soviet Oil Policy

  • AC/127(O)
  • Corporate body
  • 1960-1961

The AC/127(O) chronological series contains the records of the Ad Hoc Study Group on Soviet Oil Policy.
This study group was set up by the Council in November 1960. Comprising experts appointed by the government, it was tasked to study current and future oil export trends in the Soviet bloc, ascertain the consequences of these exports, define the principles on which the member states could base their policy in the face of increasing Soviet oil exports, taking into account their probable repercussions on the free world, and report back to the Economic Committee.
The Ad Hoc Study Group on Soviet Oil Policy met for the first time on 9 December 1960. It submitted its final report to the Economic Committee on 23 May, 1961.

Working Group on the Employment of Firms and Companies in NATO Countries on Contracts Involving the Disclosure of Classified Information

  • AC/13
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/13 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on the Employment of Firms and Companies in NATO Countries on Contracts Involving the Disclosure of Classified Information. The Working Group was created by the North Atlantic Council on 11 January 1952 to discuss the employment of contracted firms in NATO countries and the disclosure of classified information related to this employment, and to then produce a draft directive for the Council of Deputies. The Working Group held its first meeting on 11 January 1952 and met one more time in the same year. During these meetings the Working Group produced draft directives which included recommendations made by the Standing Group (S.G.92/2(Final)) regarding sub-contractors. The meetings of the Working Group were chaired by N.E.P. Sutton, Executive Secretary, and the last meeting of the Working Group was held on 24 January 1952.

Task Force on Further Action in the Field of Scientific and Technical Cooperation

  • AC/132
  • Corporate body
  • 1957

On 24 April 1957, the Council approved the report of the Task Force on Further Action in the Field of Scientific and Technical Cooperation in its "first version" (AC/123) (see C-R(57)25) and thereby the creation of AC/132 in place of AC/123. Under its terms of reference (C-M(57)50), AC/132 was required to prepare a conference of experts on actions to be taken to develop the following in the NATO nations: -a highly-qualified scientific and technical workforce-applied research (see AC/132-R/1)For NATO and the western camp, the objective was to gain the advantage over the Soviet Union in terms of defence, economics and cultural life. AC/132 was composed of: -Dr J.B. Koepfli (Chairman) and a special assistant -one or two representatives for Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom -the SHAPE Scientific Advisor The invited representatives were required to keep informed those countries which were not involved in the work. AC/132 validated a list of actions to be taken by NATO (proposed by the Chairman's assistant) (see AC/132-R/2): -create an international documentation centre-create NATO institutes specializing in research and development-develop exchange programmes between NATO nation scientists-create a science committee -create a post of Science Advisor to the Secretary General. The idea of a conference of experts was put on hold. The work of AC/132 then came to an end.

Science Committee

  • AC/137
  • Corporate body
  • 1958-1965

The AC/137 chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee. The Science Committee’s terms of reference were defined at the Council meeting on 29 January 1958 (see C-R(58)6) and presented in document AC/137-D/1. The Committee provided advice on scientific and technical issues of interest to the Atlantic Alliance. It also made recommendations on the actions that needed to be taken to develop NATO’s scientific and technical resources as well as co-operation between the countries, and recommendations regarding the support to be provided to the other international organizations.The Committee set up ad hoc working groups to formulate proposals for future scientific work. They include the following groups, under separate reference: the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Defence Aspects of Psychology (AC/137(DP)), the Defence Research Directors (AC/137(DR)), the Advisory Panel on NATO Science Research Grants (AC/137(RG)), the Working Group on Scholarships (AC/137(S)), the Advisory Group on Space Research (AC/137(SR)), the Study Group on the Von Karman Institute (AC/137(VKI)) and the Ad Hoc Working Party on the Western Science Foundation (AC/137(WF).The experts participating in those groups were appointed by the Science Committee. The work of the various groups was funded by national or international budgets in accordance with the research grant programme, or by special funds set up by NATO for that purpose. The first meeting took place on 26–28 March 1958, with the countries represented by prominent scientists. Thereafter the Science Committee met three times a year.

Science Committee Ad Hoc Working Group on the Defence Aspects of Psychology

  • AC/137(DP)
  • Corporate body
  • 1959

The AC/137(DP) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Ad Hoc Working Group on the Defence Aspects of Psychology. Established by a Science Committee decision on 23 September 1959 (see AC/137-R/5), the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Defence Aspects of Psychology defined its terms of reference at its first meeting on 2–3 November 1959. Its role was to organize a defence psychology conference in summer 1960 and to advise the Office of the Science Adviser on the actions to be taken in order to develop research on defence psychology. After the first meeting, this working group’s documents were no longer given their own specific reference but were simply incorporated into the Science Committee’s chronological document series (AC/137).

Science Committee Defence Research Directors

  • AC/137(DR)
  • Corporate body
  • 1958-1963

The AC/137(DR) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Defence Research Directors. The idea of setting up a working group for the national directors of scientific research on defence to express their opinions on ways of enhancing the effectiveness of research in the Alliance countries was first proposed in October 1958. The first informal meeting was held on 1-2 December 1958, following which it was decided that one meeting would be held per year. The last meeting was held on 21-22 November 1963, after which the Subcommittee of Defence Research Directors turned into the Committee of Defence Research Directors (see the AC/243 series).

Science Committee Advisory Panel on NATO Science Research Grants

  • AC/137(RG)
  • Corporate body
  • 1960

The AC/137(RG) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Advisory Panel on NATO Science Research Grants. This was one of three programmes of the Office of the Science Adviser to be funded by NATO in 1959. The grants had to be awarded to international research programmes. The panel was made up of five scholars, to form a group qualified to decide how such grants should be awarded (see AC/137-R/5). Initially stored under the reference AC/137(RG), the documents relating to this panel were incorporated into the Science Committee’s chronological document series as of 1961.

Science Committee Working Group on Scholarships

  • AC/137(S)
  • Corporate body
  • 1958

The AC/137(S) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Working Group on Scholarships. The Working Group was set up at the first meeting of the Science Committee, and its terms of reference were immediately defined (see AC/137-R/1). The Working Group was tasked with gathering intelligence on the frequency of university student exchanges. It also had to provide the Science Committee with proposals on NATO’s co-ordination of the frequency of the exchanges, on the Organization’s financial or other assistance in support of the countries’ student exchange efforts, and finally on NATO’s establishment of a centre tasked with co-ordinating those exchanges.It was also up to the Working Group to provide advice on promoting summer courses and the scholarships to be awarded to those registered for summer courses. After this first meeting, the documents on scholarships were incorporated into the Science Committee’s chronological document series under the reference AC/137.

Science Committee Advisory Group on Space Research

  • AC/137(SR)
  • Corporate body
  • 1960

The AC/137(SR) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Advisory Group on Space Research. Established by a Science Committee decision at its meeting on 6-7 January 1960 (see AC/137-R/6), the Advisory Group on Space Research was an unofficial ad hoc working group. Its mission was to find ways of intensifying international co-operation on space research and to see whether there were other foreseeable ways of organizing European co-operation on space research. The Science Committee took over responsibility for the topic of space research in 1961.

Science Committee Study Group on the Von Karman Institute

  • AC/137(VKI)
  • Corporate body
  • 1965

The AC/137(VKI) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Study Group on the Von Karman Institute. This study group was created by a Council decision in June 1965 (see C-R(65)30). It brought together a group of experts tasked with assessing the Von Karman Institute’s scientific work and making recommendations about its future. The Group met for the first time at the Institute on 5-7 August 1965. After the second meeting, a report concluding that it was necessary to maintain the Institute was submitted to the Science Committee (see AC/137-D/264). As the Study Group had achieved its mission, it was then disbanded.

Science Committee Ad Hoc Working Party on the Western Science Foundation

  • AC/137(WF)
  • Corporate body
  • 1958

The AC/137(WF) chronological series contains the records of the Science Committee Ad Hoc Working Party on the Western Science Foundation. The Group was made up of representatives of five Alliance countries: France, Germany, Italy, Norway and the United Kingdom. It was tasked with exploring possible ways of responding to France’s proposal of 11 February 1958 (see AC/137-D/2) on setting up a Western scientific research foundation aimed at improving international co-operation on pure science and applied science. The Working Party met on 21-22 May 1958 and concluded that there was no immediate need for such a foundation but recommended that the Science Committee look into issues related to scholarship programmes, the organization of summer courses and the awarding of research contracts. A report was submitted on 23 May 1958 (see AC/137-D/11) and, its mission accomplished, the Ad Hoc Working Party was dissolved.

Legal Working Group on Reciprocal Engagements between members of NATO and members of EDC

  • AC/14
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/14 chronological series contains the documents of the Legal Working Group on Reciprocal Engagements between members of NATO and members of the European Defence Community (EDC). The working group was set up by the Council Deputies on 31 January 1952 (see D-D(52)35). At their meeting on 19 December 1951, the Deputies decided to send a member of the International Staff (IS) as an observer to the Paris Conference for the Organization of a European Defence Community (20–21 December 1951) and the Conference of Ministers (27–30 December 1951). The observer's mission consisted in indicating to the Deputies which of the provisions proposed or discussed were likely to involve the question of relations between NATO and the EDC, i.e. those of a military, institutional, scientific or financial character (see D-D(52)3). The Working Group's task was to prepare for the North Atlantic Council (the Council) a Protocol for correlating the nations' obligations under the Treaty Establishing the EDC and the North Atlantic Treaty respectively (see D-D(52)22 and AC/14-R/1)). The Council Deputies communicated their requests for changes to the text to the Working Group through documents referenced D-D and signed by the Executive Secretary. The Working Group applied the instructions in the AC/14-D documents. A first draft and then four revisions were required before the Council could sign off on it. One or two attachés from each national delegation (1st or 2nd secretary, or advisor to the national representative) had to participate in the Working Group. Three Committee Secretaries worked in turns (see AC/14-R1 and C-N(52)4). On 27 May 1952, the "Treaty Establishing the European Defence Community" and then the "Protocol to the North Atlantic Treaty on guarantees given by the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty to the members of the European Defence Community" were signed (see ISM(52)18).

Committee on Africa

  • AC/146
  • Corporate body
  • 1959-1960

The AC/146 chronological series contains the records of the Committee on Africa.In November 1958, the Council decided to task a working group made up of the representatives of Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, Portugaland the United Kingdom to assemble, in cooperation with the International Staff, preliminary documentation on the problem of the Soviet penetration of Africa (C-R(58)54). Following this decision, the Secretary General asked the International Staff to produce a document, taking particular account of the terms of reference of the Committee at the level of the Permanent Representatives (C-R(58) 56). At its meeting on 7 January 1959 (C-R(59)1), the Council tasked the International Staff with reworking the text of the first draft (PO/58/1638). On 14 January 1959 (C-R(59)2), it approved the revised version of this draft (PO/58/1638(Revised) and decided that the Committee would hold its first meeting on 19 January 1959.The Committee's terms of reference were spelled out in PO/58/1638 (2nd revise), dated 20 January 1959. This committee, referred to as the Committee on Africa, was instructed to report back to the Council on the methods of Soviet penetration in that part of Africa situated south of the Sahara, on Soviet advances in the region and the measures adopted or proposed to address this threat, and to make suggestions to the Council. The Committee consisted of experts appointed by the following countries: Belgium,France, Italy, Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Committee's reports were sent directly to the Council.The Committee on Africa produced its documents under reference AC/146 in 1959-1960. Beginning in 1961, this reference was abandoned. The Committee's work was taken over by the Expert Working Group on Africa, attached to the Political Committee(1).

Planning Board for European Inland Surface Transport

  • AC/15
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-2010

The AC/15 chronological series contains the records of the Planning Board for European Inland Surface Transport (PBEIST). The PBEIST was established by the North Atlantic Council (Council) on 2 September 1952 (see C-R(52)14). The initial terms of reference from 9/8/1952 were revised on 4/8/1966 (C-M(66)66). The PBEIST was one of the Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) planning boards and committees, whose aim was to ensure the survival of populations in the event of an attack, the support of military operations, the protection and utilization of vital resources, and the early recovery and rehabilitation of the countries (see AC/12-D/357).In this framework, the PBEIST was responsible for drawing up plans and making policy recommendations for guaranteeing optimal wartime utilization of all inland civil and military transport in Europe (excluding air transport). The port studies were done in conjunction with the Planning Board for Ocean Shipping (PBOS) (see, for example, the terms of reference of the PBOS/PBEIST Joint Working Group created in 1989, AC/15-D/462). The PBEIST met twice a year. It carried out a biennial programme of work approved by the Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee (SCEPC) and produced activity reports plus other intermediate reports as required (see C-M(95)61).It was chaired by a chairman who was appointed for a 3-year term. The chairmanship was preferably rotational and renewable for one-year terms (see AC/98-D/161). The staff officer for inland surface transport in the CEP Directorate attended the meetings. The NATO Military Authorities and interested Member nations appointed a representative to it (see C-M(52)45).Under its terms of reference, the PBEIST could recommend the creation or dissolution of bodies to support it for specific tasks to the SCEPC. Hence, the PBEIST created a Steering Committee (AC/15(SG)) in charge of preparing the work of the PBEIST and coordinate the tasks assigned to all bodies placed under the supervision of the PBEIST, namely : The three Regional Permanent Sub-Committees Northern Europe (AC/15(NE)), Southern Europe (AC/15(SE)) and Central Europe (AC/15(CE)) ; the Permanent Railroad Transport Sub-Committee (AC/15(RRT)), the three Permanent Sub-Committees on Railway Transport (AC/15(RRT)), Road Transport (AC/15(RT)), Ports and Beaches and Inland Waterways Transport (AC/15(PB-IWT)), and Inter Modal Ad Hoc Group on the Handling of Containers (AC/15(SC)) (see C-M(89)82). On 8/6/2010, the PBOS and the PBEIST merged into the Transport Group (AC/329). This marked the end of the PBEIST (see PO(2010)0074-REV2).

Restricted Committee of the Planning Board for Inland Surface Transport (AC/15(SG))

  • AC/15(SG)
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1966

The AC/15(SG) chronological series contains the documents of the Steering Group of the Planning Board for Inland Surface Transport (hereinafter referred to as the Restricted Committee). The Restricted Committee was established by the PBEIST (or AC/15) on 23 September 1952 (see AC/15-R/3). The initial terms of reference established on 06/10/1952 (see AC/15(SG)D/1) were approved by the PBEIST on 02/12/1952 (see AC/15-R/5). These terms of reference were revised on 22/07/1954 (see AC/15(SG)R/13) and approved by the PBEIST on 21/03/1955 (see AC/15-R/10). The PBEIST was one of the Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) Planning Boards and Committees. To help it in its mission (i.e. in the event of an attack to ensure the survival of the population, support to military operations, protection of vital resources and national recovery, see AC/12-D/357), the PBEIST created a Restricted Committee. The organization and functions of the Restricted Committee were established in close collaboration between the PBEIST and SHAPE (see AC/15(SG)-D/2). The Restricted Committee was responsible for preparing the work of the PBEIST and coordinating the tasks entrusted to all the bodies which were answerable to the PBEIST, in particular the three regional committees (North, Centre and South Europe) and the seven working groups set up within them. To this end, it was authorized to give these groups all required information and instructions (see AC/15-D/1). The Restricted Committee was headed by a chairman who was assisted by a rapporteur (see AC/15-D/1). From 1952 to 1954, it included delegates from Belgium, France, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States, and also a representative of SACEUR (see AC/15-R/3). Following a revision of its terms of reference in 1954, it included a representative of each of the regional committees and a representative of SACEUR. Any representative of a member nation could also ask to take part in meetings (see AC/15-D/35). The Restricted Committee reported to the PBEIST. It notified (with its opinion) the PBEIST of all the kinds of work with which it was charged, as well as the final reports of each working group and their sub-groups (see AC/15-D/1). The Restricted Committee was renamed the Steering Group in September 1958 (see AC/15(SG)-R/25). It held its last meeting on 23 and 24 May 1966. A further meeting was scheduled for 5 and 6 December 1966, but no meeting was held on those dates or subsequently (AC/15(SG)R/45). The Restricted Committee can therefore be regarded as dormant since 1966.

North Atlantic Studies Committee

  • AC/151
  • Corporate body
  • 1959-1960

The AC/151 chronological series contains the records of the North Atlantic Studies Committee. On 23 March 1958 the Expert Working Group on the Fellowship and Scholarship Program met and recommended the creation of a Committee for North Atlantic Studies to include scholars from all member countries who would propose subjects for studies and supervise the Fellowship Program (see C-M(58)133). Based on this proposal, NATO Secretary General Mr. Spaak asked the Council to approve the creation and terms of reference of the Committee (see PO(58)1452, C-R(58)56 , PO(59)219 and C-R(59)11). Following several drafts, the terms of reference were finally approved for the newly defined provisional Committee on 20 March 1959 (see PO(59)479). The Committee consisted of a Chairman -Belgian Permanent Representative Mr. de Staercke- and a representative member from all the other nationalities. On 11 June 1959 the North Atlantic Studies Committee held its first meeting to designate NATO fellows for the period 1959-1960 (see C-M(59)64).During the Council meeting of 17 June 1959 it was proposed by the Belgian representative to add a supplement to the publication “NATO – the First Five Years” (C-R(59)24) On 1 September 1959 the Assistant Secretary General for Political Affairs also issued a memorandum on a proposed sequel to the publication “NATO – the First Five Years” by Lord Ismay. In this memorandum it was recommended to create a permanent historical section to put some order to NATO’s records and to prepare historical studies (see AC/151-D(59)1)The North Atlantic Studies Committee held its second meeting on 10-11 September 1959 where it was decided to recommend to the Council to approve the elaboration of studies about the Alliance, a booklet on NATO communiqués, the setting up within the International Staff of a permanent historical section and the provision of support to the Atlantic Treaty Association Conference for University Teachers of International Public Law and International Relations (see AC/151-R(59)1). These recommendations were approved by the Council on 21 October 1959 (see C-R(59)35). During this Council meeting, there were some discussions about the creation of an Atlantic Institute for studies as proposed in AC/52-D(58)31, whose purposes were defined by the Committee on Information and Cultural Relations in document AC/52-WP(60)45. The last meeting of the North Atlantic Studies Committee took place on 31 March 1960 when the NATO fellows for 1960-1961 were selected (see PO(61)296). On 1 January 1961 the Atlantic Institute was created to take over some of the functions of the North Atlantic Studies Committee (see PO(61)80). During the Council meeting of 15 March 1961 it was agreed that a Selection Committee should be created as proposed in PO/61/296 for the fellowship programme, and it was decided to disband the North Atlantic Studies Committee (see C-R(61)9).

Steering Group on Reform of the Annual Review

  • AC/159
  • Corporate body
  • 1960

The AC/159 chronological series contains documents on the reform of the annual review. From 1952 to 1966, the annual review was one of NATO’s main tasks. This process evolved to become one of the factors guiding the development of the Alliance’s defence(1). Over time, the annual review procedure became very time-consuming. The review was too complicated and covered too many questions of detail, and it no longer fully served its purpose. From 1959, nations began to question its efficiency. In December 1959, the Council decided to make a more thorough study of the proposals of the Standing Group and Norway on modifying the procedure for future annual reviews. Subsequently, at its meeting on 13 January 1960, it set up a restricted group, namely the Steering Group on Reform of the Annual Review. This group comprised the permanent representatives of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, the Netherlands, Turkey, the United Kingdomand the United States. One representative of the Standing Group and appropriate members of the International Staff also attended the meetings of the Group, which elected its own Chairman. AC/159 was tasked with studying possible modifications to the annual review to make it both simpler and more effective. The purpose of the Group’s first meeting on 19 January 1960 was to elect a Chairman, develop a work method and establish a programme. Mr J. Léger, the Canadian Permanent Representative, was chosen as Chairman. The Group met six times between 19 January and 4 March 1960, at which point it decided to present its report to the Council and to discontinue its activities. The Group’s report, which was approved by the Council on 23 March 1960 (C-M(60)20), proposed that the annual review should be carried out on a triennial rather than annual basis, so that nations‘ defence programmes could be re-assessed every three years in the light of NATO’s overall requirements. Circumstances prevented the triennial procedure from being fully implemented.

Working Group on Aircraft Production Planning

  • AC/16
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/16 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on Aircraft Production Planning. The Working Group was created by the North Atlantic Council on 2 April 1952 to review the recommendations laid out in a report by the Combined Aircraft Working Party on 18th January 1952, in light of the comments of Member Governments. The meetings of the Working Group were chaired by Group Captain Lee of the United Kingdom, and were attended by representatives of Canada, France, Italy, the Netherlands, the United States, the United Kingdom, the International Staff and NATO and the DPE. A representative for Belgium was present only at the first meeting. The Working Group held its first meeting on 7 April 1952 and met three more times in that month. During these meetings the Working Group proposed changes to the recommendations for Aircraft Production Planning. The last meeting of the Working Group was held on 16 April 1952.

Working Group on TCC Questionnaires

  • AC/17
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/17 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on TCC Questionnaires. The Working Group was created by the North Atlantic Council Deputies to give the Greek and Turkish Representatives an idea of the kind of information the International Secretariat wished to know about their countries, in order to carry out the annual review in the autumn of 1952. The meeting of the Working Group was chaired by Mr. G.S. Taylor and was attended by representatives of the Greek and Turkish delegations, as well as members of the Defence Production Board, Financial and Economic Board, the Standing Group and Council Deputies. The Working Group held its first and only meeting on 1 April 1952.

Working Group to examine the question of a permanent headquarters for NATO

  • AC/18
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/18 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group to examine the question of a permanent headquarters for NATO in Paris. The Working Group was set up by the Council on 28 April 1952 (see C-R(52)1). It was not given any official terms of reference, but its successive activity reports provide more details on its mission. NATO moved into its temporary premises in the Palais de Chaillot on 16 April 1952. The Working Group's mission was to choose the best possible location for the future permanent HQ of the newly-created International Staff in Paris (see AC/18-R/1). It was chaired by Mr Van Vredenburch, Deputy Secretary General (see AC/18-R/1). The Belgian, French, Norwegian, American and Portuguese delegations accepted the Secretary General's invitation and appointed a representative to the Working Group (see C-M(52)24). The Working Group held four meetings, each of which began with a presentation by the French Representative on the new proposals he had received from the French Government. At the end of these meetings, the Working Group submitted its proposals to the Council in the form of reports (see C-R(52)1). The discussions were treated as confidential in order to obviate any danger of prejudicing negotiations in progress for the purchase of the land (see C-M(52)24 and C-M(52)54). The Working Group held its last meeting on 24 June 1952.

Committee of the Annual Review

  • AC/19
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1967

The AC/19 chronological series contains the records of the Committee of the Annual Review. At the conference held in Lisbon in February 1952, the Council decided that the relevant NATO bodies should undertake an ongoing review of the requirements arising from the creation of an adequate defence capability (C9-D/20 dated 23 February 1952). The Council and the International Staff should be organized in such a way that the requirements of NATO programmes would coincide with the real possibilities of implementation at the political and economic levels. With a view to supervising and coordinating all activities in this area, the Council decided at its meeting of 6 May 1952 to set up a working group on the annual report under the chairmanship of the Deputy Secretary General (C-R(52)2).This working group, which was soon to acquire committee status(1) (ISM(52)29), met for the first time on 8 May 1952 under the chairmanshipof Mr H. van Vredenburch, Deputy Secretary General. The Committee of the Annual Review comprised representatives of all the NATO member nations, together with representatives of the International Staff and the Standing Group Liaison Office.The role of the Committee was to supervise the organization of the annual review in order to ensure that political and military directives were implemented. One of the aims of the annual review was to form a clear idea of the defence effort of each nation. The first meetings were mainly devoted to the organization of the annual review and the establishment of working groups(2). Thereafter, each year, the Committee laid downthe procedure, set the work schedule and issued instructions for the overview report to the Council. During its meetings it examined the information provided by member nations in response to the questionnaire on their defence status. The annual review underwent a number of modifications over the years, but in general the procedures changed very little.By the beginning of the 1960s the annual review procedure had become very time-consuming, and nations began to question its efficiency(3). In January 1960, the Council tasked the Steering Group(4) with studying possible modifications to the annual review to make it both simpler and more efficient. The Group’s report proposed that the review should be carried out on a triennal rather than annual basis, so that nations’ defence programmes could be re-assessed every three years in the light of NATO’s global requirements. Circumstances prevented the triennial procedure from being fully implemented.From 1963 onwards, the annual/triennal review ceased to be a priority and was eclipsed by the preparations for forming long-term plans for NATO as decided at the Ottawa ministerial meetings. Under the new procedure, the Committee should adopt a horizontal approach to problems rather than focusing on the situation in each country. The last annual review organized by AC/19 was in 1966. The Committee of the Annual Review was disbanded and replaced by the Defence Review Committee as from 1967(5).

Annual Review Committee - Ad Hoc Working Group

  • AC/19(WG)
  • Corporate body
  • 1958

The AC/19(WG) sub-series contains the records of the Ad Hoc Working Group of the Annual Review Committee.

The Ad Hoc Working Group was created by the Annual Review Committee on 20 January 1958 to create draft reports to the North Atlantic Council. The Working Group was chaired by the Assistant Secretary General for Economics and Finance, and consisted of representatives from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States (AC/19-N/36).

The Working Group issued documents that dealt with the implementation of resolution C-M(54)85, which itself addresses defence co-operation with the Western European Union, and increased authority for SACEUR.

Political Working Group

  • AC/2
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1952

The AC/2 chronological series contains the records of the Political Working Group. The Political Working Group was active between March 1951 and March 1952(1) and met in Belgrave Square, London. After that date there are no records testifying to its existence. Having achieved its mission, it was disbanded after the ninth session of the North Atlantic Council. The Political Working Group’s role was to reorganize NATO and to provide the Council Deputies with information about East Germany, Western European countries, the USSR and Switzerland, and about the relative political, economic and military capabilities of NATO and the USSR. After the Political Working Group disbanded, the Council assumed responsibility for political issues until 1957. The Working Group on Trends of Soviet Policy (AC/34) took over the issue of the orientation of Soviet foreign policy.

Committee to Reduce Deficiencies

  • AC/20
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/20 chronological series contains the records of the Committee on the Financing of Additional Aircraft Production.The Committee was created by the North Atlantic Council on 13 May 1952 to discuss the financing of additional aircraft production and to consider ways and means of activating the additional production of aircraft; the Working Group would then submit a report to the Council. The meetings of the Committee were chaired by Mr. R. Sergent, Assistant Secretary General for Economic Affairs, and were attended by representatives of Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States, the International Staff and the Standing Group. The Committee held its first meeting on 16 May 1952 and its last meeting was held on 30 May 1952.

Ad Hoc Working Group on Resolution C-M(60)142

  • AC/200
  • Corporate body
  • 1960

The AC/200 chronological series contains the documents of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Resolution C-M(60)142.This group was created by the Council in March 1961, on a proposal by Turkey. It was tasked with identifying the means of implementing the resolution on assistance to the less-developed member countries which was adopted at the December 1960 Ministerial (C-M(60)142).In addition to the representatives from Greece, Turkey and members of the International Staff, the Group consisted of delegates from the following seven countries: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. It was to report to the Council before the Oslo Ministerial and, with this in mind, it prepared a draft report in which it recommended sending a mission to Greece and Turkey. The Council approved this planned mission and tasked the Secretary General with choosing the officials who would be going.After this decision was made, the Group felt that its work was completed.

Working Group on Economic Counter-Measures

  • AC/202
  • Corporate body
  • 1961

The AC/202 chronological series contains records of the Working Group on Economic Counter-measures. This group was established by the Council on 21 August 1961 (C-R(61)37) to examine the economic measures proposed by the Group of Four (United States, United Kingdom, France and the Federal Republic of Germany) further to the Soviet ultimatum of June 1961 (Berlin crisis). Consisting of members of the Political and Economics Committees, it was chaired jointly by the Chairmen of both committees. Its full name was "Working Group on Possible Economic Counter-Measures to deal with the Berlin Crisis". The Group was assigned the following tasks: - to examine the various aspects of the economic counter-measures being contemplated by the four Powers; - to seek to assess the political and economic impact of the enforcement of a total economic blockade of the Soviet bloc, as well as such special economic counter-measures as may be appropriate to deal with various eventualities; - to consider the consequences which the application of these measures would entail for each NATO country, as well as the resources for avoiding or mitigating any unfavourable impact on these countries.The Group met twelve times between 25 August 1961 and 21 December 1961, at which time it was decided to submit its final report to the Council and terminate its work.

Committee to Examine the EDC Treaty

  • AC/21
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/21 chronological series contains the records of the Committee to Examine the EDC Treaty.This Committee was created by a Council decision on 13 May 1952 (see C-M(52)3) to carry out the verification work on the Treaty Establishing the European Defence Community (EDC). It had to secure military experts’ support for examining the military aspects of the treaty.The Committee was comprised of national representatives and the Standing Group’s Liaison Officer or a member of his staff. It was chaired by Mr Fenoaltea and met four times in the 16–26 May 1952 period. On 26 May, the Committee submitted a report to the Council (see C-M(52)20) inviting the countries to sign the treaty.Once its mission had been accomplished, the Committee to Examine the EDC Treaty was disbanded.

International Staff Team on Additional Aircraft Production

  • AC/22
  • Corporate body
  • 1952

The AC/22 chronological series contains the records of the International Staff Team on Additional Aircraft Production.The Staff Team was created by the Council on 11 June 1952, following a proposal by the United States representative which outlined the conditions for offshore procurement of complete aircraft. The United States was willing to procure aircraft in Europe and co-operate with any country which would come up with a substantial measure of aircraft production on its behalf with its own finances in support of an integrated plan aimed at fulfilling NATO aircraft deficiencies.The only meeting of the Staff Team took place on 16 June 1952, and was attended by national representatives from Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. Also present was the Chief of Staff, Defence Production, members of the Aircraft Division and two representatives of the Standing Group.The task of the Staff Team was to determine the scale of effort the individual nations were able to make, and then weld these together into a coordinated programme to be submitted to the Council before transmission to the United States Government. The report was submitted to the Council as C-M(52)43.

Committee on Civil Organization in Time of War

  • AC/23
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1955

The AC/23 chronological series contains the records of the Committee on Civil Organization in Time of War (hereinafter referred to as AC/23). In a memorandum dated 6 June 1952 (see C-M(52)27), the Secretary General invited the Council to make plans for the organization of the civil population and for countering a possible Soviet "fifth column" in the NATO countries in the event of war. Consequently, on 11 June 1952, the Council decided to set up a Working Group on Civil Organization in Time of War (see C-R(52)8). It was renamed the Committee on Civil Organization in Time of War after November 1952 (see AC/23-D/17). AC/23 was created to consider and report to the Council on the aspects of civil organization of North Atlantic Treaty countries in time of war that should be studied and how the studies should best be carried out. AC/23 was made up of a representative nominated by each Member state and a chairman (Sir Hoyer Millar) nominated by the Secretary General (see AC/23-N/1). The chairman of the two AC/23 sub-committees, the representative of the Standing Group Liaison Office in London and then in Paris, and a SHAPE representative also attended the meetings. The Secretary General, in a letter dated 30 July 1952, invited each of the Member States to provide information about the measures they had already taken in this area (see C-M(52)101). In the light of the replies, AC/23 chose to address matters of civil defence and refugees separately (see AC/23-R/3). On 29 November 1952, two sub-committees were created for that purpose and answerable to it: the Civil Defence Committee (AC/23(CD)) and the Committee on Refugees and Evacuees (see AC/23-D/25). AC/23 held its last meeting on 2 December 1954 (see AC/23-/13). On 9 November 1955, the Council approved the creation of the Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee (AC/98 or CEPC) and decided to dissolve the Committee on Civil Organization in Time of War (see C-M(55)100 and C-R(55)50). This was to avoid duplication of effort on coordination, which would henceforth be handled by AC/98. The acronym AC/23 was taken over in April 1956 by the Civil Protection Committee (formerly AC/23(CD)).

Civil Protection Committee

  • AC/23(CD)
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1970

The AC/23(CD) chronological series contains the records of the Civil Protection Committee (hereinafter referred to as the CPC). The CPC was established and its terms of reference approved by the North Atlantic Council (Council) on 19 November 1952 as proposed by the Working Group of Civil Organization in Time of War (AC/23) (see C-R(52)29 and AC/23-D/25). The initial terms of reference were revised on 04/08/1966 (C-M(66)66), 07/11/1988 (AC/23-D/798) and 05/10/1994 (AC/23-D/818). Within its terms of reference, the CPC's tasks were defined by the MInisterial Guidance for Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) (for example, C-M(81)21), which was part of the Civil Emergency Planning and Review Cycle. The CPC was one of eight Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) planning boards and committees which were intended to ensure, in the event of an attack, the survival of populations, the support of military operations, the protection and use of vital resources, and the early recovery and rehabilitation of countries (see AC/12-D/357).The CPC dealt with the international coordination of planning in the area of civil protection at times of crisis or war (see AC/23-D/98). More specifically, it supervised the effectiveness of the NATO Refugee Agency (NRA), coordinated NRA participation in NATO exercises, drew up joint action plans in the event of attack and analysed the consequences (see AC/23-D/798 and C-M(66)66).The CPC did not deal with general policy issues in the area of civil protection. These were the responsibility of AC/23, which was the superior body (see AC/23(CD)-D/1). The CPC met at least once a year. Each member country could be represented, as well as the NATO Military Authorities. Its chairman was appointed for a three-year term. The chairmanship was preferably rotational (see AC/98-D/161). It reported to the Civil Emergency Planning Committee (CEPC) and, through the latter, to the Council (PO(2010)0074-REV2).The CPC was authorized to create bodies to assist it in specific tasks; in 1965 there were nine such subordinate bodies (see AC/23(CD)N/108).

Working Group on Information Policy

  • AC/24
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1953

The AC/24 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on Information Policy. This group was established by the Council on 25 June 1952 under the title "Working Group on General Information Policy". It was given the following terms of reference:1)assemble the ideas to be inculcated in the nations of the Atlantic Community;2) express opinions on how these ideas should be presented;3)express opinions on the choice of bodies or resources to be employed in discharging its duties. The Group met for the first time on 9 July 1952. In early December 1952, it deleted the word "general" from its title, assuming the name "Working Group on Information Policy".At its meeting on 24 July 1952, the Council broadened the Working Group's terms of reference, tasking it to report back on the most practical methods for allowing NATO to advise governments on the best policy to be adopted in order to counter Communist propaganda. Among the tasks performed by the Group, also worthy of mention is the preparation and organization of the Conference on NATO Information Policy, which was held in February 1953. The Group also discussed issues pertaining to NATO's policy objectives in the areas of propaganda and counter-propaganda, radio programming, tours by journalists, etc. In July 1953, further to a Council decision, the Working Group on Information Policy merged with the Working Group on Social and Cultural Co-operation(1) to form the Committee on Information and Cultural Relations(2).

Working Group on the Ministerial Meeting of the Council

  • AC/26
  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1956

The AC/26 chronological series contains the records of the Working Group on the Ministerial Meeting of the Council. The Working Group was created by the North Atlantic Council on 24 July 1952 to examine arguments for and against holding a Ministerial meeting that coming Autumn and to then propose a draft agenda should that meeting take place (C-R(52)17 Item II).The meetings of the Working Group were chaired by Mr Richard D Coleridge (later Lord Coleridge), Executive Secretary, and were attended by a representative of each national delegation, members of the International Staff from a relevant division, such as Political Affairs or Economics and Finance, and occasionally a Standing Group Liaison Officer. The Working Group held its first meeting on 5 August 1952, and met 24 more times over the succeeding four years. The group generally conducted two to three meetings each year during the Spring and Fall, in advance of the Ministerial meetings of the Council. During these meetings the Working Group discussed what should be included on the agenda of the upcoming Ministerial meeting, and whether or not a public session should be held. The last meeting of the Working Group was held on 11 April 1956.

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